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23

Feb

19

Feb

First Look Of “Chashme Baddoor”

First Look Of “Chashme Baddoor”

First Look Of “Chashme Baddoor”

First Look Of “Chashme Baddoor”

25

Jan

Movie review: Akaash Vani

 (Romance)
Cast:Kartik Tiwari, Nusrat Bharucha Director: Luv Ranjan 

In one of the film’s high dramatic moments shot on a small deserted railway station in the night, the film’s protagonists, now estranged by an unfortunate series of circumstances, sit on the bench and… well, they sob. Yes, they simply cry their hearts out. First, the girl. Then in a melancholic celebration of the me-too syndrome, the boy, now alas no longer a boy (and he smokes to prove it), also breaks into little sobs that build up into a wail as the shehnai, indicative of a cruel marital joke, plays in the background. 
The sequence in the hands of a lesser director would have fallen flat on its sobbing face. Luv Ranjan has the punch-filled boys-will-be-boys saga Pyaar Ka Punchnama behind him to prove his solid grip over the grammar of the hearts of the young and the confused.Akaash (Kartik Tiwari) and Vani (Nushrat Bharucha) seem clueless about what they really want out of life, or from each other. Is Akaash fooling around with her in the college ? Is he serious in his filmy antics? Or filmy in his serious antics?Ranjan’s screenplay takes the lovers from the corny escapades and frigid philosophising of the college campus to the precipice of heartbreak. The journey, given a vivid visual manifestation by Sudhir K Chaudhuri’s fluid camera work, is made with ample feeling and remarkable restrain.Unlike other contemporary celluloid raconteurs, Ranjan is not fearful of silences. He doesn’t fill up every conceivable nook and corner of the storytelling with words and music, though I must state here that Hitesh Sonik’s background music and the songs in the later part of the film go a long way in building an appealing case for the lead pair’s star-crossed relationship. If Akaash and Vani seem so lost without each other, it is a lot to do with the way their emotions are pinned down by the words and the music that underline the course of their togetherness.On many occasions, Ranjan allows the lead pair to share silences. A rarity in today’s cinema, where it is presumed that the average moviegoer has the attention-span of a sparrow looking for twigs before the rain starts pelting down. There are long meditative stretches of just simple non-verbal communication between the protagonists. It is a risk to allow audiences to get restive. But a risk worth taking.Ranjan’s lovers come across as people who do what they do not to impress others, but simply because their heart tells them to behave the way they are shown. Both the lead actors are extremely effective in showing their character’s innerworld. Nushrat Bharucha has an author-backed role as the girl who must sacrifice her love to make her parents happy. Not exactly the most novel of ideas. The sincerity with which the young almost-new actress approaches her part, propels it to a level beyond the mundane.Yes, you feel the girl is trapped in a marriage of compromise where the cruelty is so intangible and prone to sarcasm, that it seems negligible from the outside. Ranjan shows Vani’s suffocation through some disturbing scenes of marital rape. Outwardly, Vani’s husband is no brute. She carries no signs of his cruelty on her body. It is worse. The soul gets wounded.In a languorously-shot lengthy stretch of post-marital escape into Utopian happiness, we see Vani united with her lover again. They spend time together, frolic in the snow, live out some of the dreams they had dreamt during courtship. They don’t talk much. And when they do, the words are never meant to impress us. For a change, the couple seems to be talking to each other rather than to an imaginary audience.Though the film belongs to the female protagonist, Kartik Tiwari manages to hold his own with an endearing performance far removed from what he attempted in the director’s Pyaar Ka Punchnama. Both Kartik and Nushrat are here to stay.Though there are patches of aridity in the relationship (what was Akaash doing while Vani was suffering in malfunctional domesticity?), this is a very good film about a bad marriage, or what havoc a wrong decision about one’s life can create.To his credit, Ranjan is able to hold the lovers’ predicament in place. He has a keen eye for the inner life of his protagonists. Ranjan quietly sucks us into the story of Akaash and Vani.Suffused in contemplative silences and deriving its dramatic energy from the age-old debate on arranged versus love marriages, Akaash Vani is thoughtful and absorbing, not prone to tripping over with nervous anxiety and excessive energy to hold our attention.The world of Akaash Vani is far removed from the bantering bawdy backchat of Pyaar Ka Punchnama. But that is the beauty of the second film. It tells you that the director is not frozen in his initial world.With first-rate performances by both Nushrat and Kartik, this is one love story you can’t afford to miss.
Movie review: Akaash Vani
Movie review: Race 2
 (Action/Thriller)
Cast:Saif Ali Khan, John Abraham, Deepika Padukone, Jacqueline Fernandez, Ameesha Patel, Anil Kapoor Director: Abbas-Mustan 
SPOILERS AHEADA significant chunk of Mumbai filmdom’s creative output has changed for the better since the year 2008, the first quarter of which saw the release of Race, a Hollywood rip-off that had Bollywood critics run for cover.
Nearly five years on, the directing duo of Abbas-Mustan is still at it – cantering around aimlessly with a convoluted thriller that zips, zaps and zooms through an amoral landscape peopled by sharks and bloodhounds whose only trip in life is to settle old scores, hatch new conspiracies and, when necessary, lay murderous traps. 
On the face of it, Race 2 is a glitzy, action-packed entertainer. Scratch the surface – in fact, that is all there is to the film – and what you are left with is superficial style bereft of logic and substance. 
But, then, isn’t that the failsafe formula that has stood many a Bollywood pulp-maker in good stead over the years? 
Race 2 proves how difficult it can be for a producer to let go of an idea that yielded a box-office bonanza the first time around. The makers of this film obviously haven’t heard of, or do not believe in, the law of diminishing returns. 
Race 2 isn’t so much a sequel as an ill-advised rehash. Revenge, one character says, is a dish best served cold. Ideas, for sure, aren’t best served stale.
This is the second year in succession after 2012’s Players that Abbas-Mustan have the honour of unleashing the first Bollywood biggie of the year. Race 2, like Players, is big only on nausea-inducing clatter. 
The obvious question is: does this slapdash scurry to the finishing line really have the steam to replicate the kind of runaway box-office success that the prelude had enjoyed? 
Or will Race 2 go the way of the wayward Players, the Burmawalla siblings’ official Hindi remake of the British crime caper flick, The Italian Job?
At the heart of Race 2 are two wrangling men endowed with sculpted bodies and an ingrained air of masculine insouciance. 
The brawny John Abraham (replacing the relatively scrawny Akshaye Khanna of the earlier film) ensures that the sequel has a markedly higher beefcake and testosterone quotient. 
Keeping the boys company is a trio of bimbos all too eager to flash generous décolletage while playing second fiddle. All of the above is, of course, par for the course in an Abbas-Mustan film. 
Many of the faces and the principal location have changed in the sequel, but the overall veneer is pretty much the same. 
Race 2 is slickly packaged around dramatic twists and turns that fly at you thicker and faster than you care to count.
Race 2 moves at a fair clip and is packed with explosions, stunts and chases that might be crowd-pleasing. The trouble is that the narrative is too breathless for its own good.
To be fair, some of the implausible action sequences are startlingly good. However, they do not add up to a convincing enough whole that can paper over the holes in the narrative. 
Some Bollywood directors tend to labour under the misplaced belief that a film must be crammed, end to end, with relentless excitement, extravagant dance routines and ear-splitting background music for it to find ready takers. Excess does not always yield success. 
The action in Race 2 takes place in Turkey, where, we learn, that the Indian underworld is just as active as it is back home. 
Ranveer Singh (Saif Ali Khan), a rare remnant from Race, scours the hot spots of Istanbul in search of the mastermind behind the killing of his beloved Sonia (Bipasha Basu in a cameo). 
In his risky quest, Ranveer has to contend with a slew of men and women who, like him, are out to make a quick buck and get the hell out of here. 
And, of course, there is ex-cop Robert D’Costa (Anil Kapoor), the only man who Ranvir seemed to be at ease with when the curtains came down on the first film. 
The private eye has a gloriously daft female assistant in the form of Ameesha Patel. The actress isn’t seen much these days on the screen. Just as well! 
Istanbul generally looks great as a backdrop through the lens of Ravi Yadav’s camera and much of the film is rather easy on the eye. But when the cars and bloodthirsty men get in the way, they only serve to muck up the view.
As for the women on the screen (Deepika Padukone and Jacqueline Fernandez), they strut around like wound-up automatons that are all decked-up but have nowhere to go. 
Is Race 2 on your mind? Get rid of it pronto. This is a wreck of a movie strictly for action junkies who might be looking for a feverish two-and-a-half-hour ride that is far more giddy than heady.

Movie review: Race 2

imageimageimageimageimage (Action/Thriller)

Cast:Saif Ali Khan, John Abraham, Deepika Padukone, Jacqueline Fernandez, Ameesha Patel, Anil Kapoor 
Director: Abbas-Mustan 

SPOILERS AHEAD

  • A significant chunk of Mumbai filmdom’s creative output has changed for the better since the year 2008, the first quarter of which saw the release of Race, a Hollywood rip-off that had Bollywood critics run for cover.

  • Nearly five years on, the directing duo of Abbas-Mustan is still at it – cantering around aimlessly with a convoluted thriller that zips, zaps and zooms through an amoral landscape peopled by sharks and bloodhounds whose only trip in life is to settle old scores, hatch new conspiracies and, when necessary, lay murderous traps. 

  • On the face of it, Race 2 is a glitzy, action-packed entertainer. Scratch the surface – in fact, that is all there is to the film – and what you are left with is superficial style bereft of logic and substance. 

  • But, then, isn’t that the failsafe formula that has stood many a Bollywood pulp-maker in good stead over the years? 

  • Race 2 proves how difficult it can be for a producer to let go of an idea that yielded a box-office bonanza the first time around. The makers of this film obviously haven’t heard of, or do not believe in, the law of diminishing returns. 

  • Race 2 isn’t so much a sequel as an ill-advised rehash. Revenge, one character says, is a dish best served cold. Ideas, for sure, aren’t best served stale.

  • This is the second year in succession after 2012’s Players that Abbas-Mustan have the honour of unleashing the first Bollywood biggie of the year. Race 2, like Players, is big only on nausea-inducing clatter. 

  • The obvious question is: does this slapdash scurry to the finishing line really have the steam to replicate the kind of runaway box-office success that the prelude had enjoyed? 

  • Or will Race 2 go the way of the wayward Players, the Burmawalla siblings’ official Hindi remake of the British crime caper flick, The Italian Job?

  • At the heart of Race 2 are two wrangling men endowed with sculpted bodies and an ingrained air of masculine insouciance. 

  • The brawny John Abraham (replacing the relatively scrawny Akshaye Khanna of the earlier film) ensures that the sequel has a markedly higher beefcake and testosterone quotient. 

  • Keeping the boys company is a trio of bimbos all too eager to flash generous décolletage while playing second fiddle. All of the above is, of course, par for the course in an Abbas-Mustan film. 

  • Many of the faces and the principal location have changed in the sequel, but the overall veneer is pretty much the same. 

  • Race 2 is slickly packaged around dramatic twists and turns that fly at you thicker and faster than you care to count.

  • Race 2 moves at a fair clip and is packed with explosions, stunts and chases that might be crowd-pleasing. The trouble is that the narrative is too breathless for its own good.

  • To be fair, some of the implausible action sequences are startlingly good. However, they do not add up to a convincing enough whole that can paper over the holes in the narrative. 

  • Some Bollywood directors tend to labour under the misplaced belief that a film must be crammed, end to end, with relentless excitement, extravagant dance routines and ear-splitting background music for it to find ready takers. Excess does not always yield success. 

  • The action in Race 2 takes place in Turkey, where, we learn, that the Indian underworld is just as active as it is back home. 

  • Ranveer Singh (Saif Ali Khan), a rare remnant from Race, scours the hot spots of Istanbul in search of the mastermind behind the killing of his beloved Sonia (Bipasha Basu in a cameo). 

  • In his risky quest, Ranveer has to contend with a slew of men and women who, like him, are out to make a quick buck and get the hell out of here. 

  • And, of course, there is ex-cop Robert D’Costa (Anil Kapoor), the only man who Ranvir seemed to be at ease with when the curtains came down on the first film. 

  • The private eye has a gloriously daft female assistant in the form of Ameesha Patel. The actress isn’t seen much these days on the screen. Just as well! 

  • Istanbul generally looks great as a backdrop through the lens of Ravi Yadav’s camera and much of the film is rather easy on the eye. But when the cars and bloodthirsty men get in the way, they only serve to muck up the view.

  • As for the women on the screen (Deepika Padukone and Jacqueline Fernandez), they strut around like wound-up automatons that are all decked-up but have nowhere to go. 

  • Is Race 2 on your mind? Get rid of it pronto. This is a wreck of a movie strictly for action junkies who might be looking for a feverish two-and-a-half-hour ride that is far more giddy than heady.

23

Jan